Update on Theme Statement for Self-Coaching Book

Here’s an update to my post about Mark’s self-coaching book theme statement.

Following a phone conversation today with James Brown, one of the mentors in the ‘Effortless Authorship’ program, it looks like Mark’s all set to go with book theme number two:

Book Theme Statement #2

How to self-coach career change using just five rules and some intelligent conversations with your inner sensei.
Japan-based author and international career changer, Mark McClure, shows you what’s possible.

James touched on some important points about a book’s wider purpose and also the author’s passion in communicating the message.

tokyo-shinjuku

In Mark’s case, I feel that book theme #2 has five merits going for it:

1) Self-Coaching:

Coaching has worked its way into the business world but, due mainly to high cost and limited time, not many get to experience what an external coach can do for their career (and life, since the two are often linked by necessity and habit.) There’s much less known about self-coaching and how to use it effectively.

2) Career Change:

Economic dislocations in Europe. Long term unemployment in the US. The BRIC countries’ rapid growth and industrialization. The pace and impact of technological advances. And these are just some of the macro factors at work!

Mix the ‘knowledge explosion’ with the dissolving of ‘job for life’ social contracts in many countries, and the ingredients of career change require a recipe for action by individuals – be they employees, managers, entrepreneurs or small business owners.

3) Just Five Rules:

Many people like systems and structures they can gauge progress against. ‘Just Five Rules‘ is the author’s generic approach to self-coaching in general. The book’s purpose is to teach readers how to apply similar rules and habits in their own career change paths.

4) Intelligent Conversations with Your Inner Sensei:

According to Michael Levin’s teaching, most successful non-fiction (business) books have one or two key ideas that are repeated and emphasized throughout. A (ghost)writer’s goal is to present these ideas in ways that hold the interest of readers from start to finish. When done right, the book comes “highly recommended.”  Alas, not all reach these heights and Michael’s use of “hamburger filler” gives an inkling of what awaits the unwary.

For Mark’s book, I think the ‘inner sensei’ meme offers an interesting ‘East meets West’ approach to personal growth and career fulfillment. Who wouldn’t want to have “intelligent conversations” with a wiser sensei? What will set the book apart from others is the author’s 18 years spent living and working in Japan.

5) International Career Changer, Mark McClure:

Yes, there’s a touch of hyperbole here but well-grounded in fact. In addition to coaching and working with other career changers and ‘transitioners’, Mark has also changed careers twice. Once, in the dark ‘BI’ years (‘Before Internet’) and again, in mid-life. Although self-coaching only came to his conscious awareness from around 2005, a life based even unconsciously on the power of self-coaching has many nuggets of experience worth mining for the benefit of readers.

To The Effortless Authorship Launch Pad…

Mark’s next steps in implementing Michael Levin’s program to ‘ghostwrite your own book’ are:

  1. Draft at least twenty problems, issues, dilemmas, that readers interested in career changing and self-coaching face regularly.
  2. Outline ‘chapter one’ (the ‘author as hero’ approach for self-coaching with the inner sensei) and record it.
  3. Outline each of the five rules as a method for self-coachers to apply in their own situations.
  4. Start thinking about how the book may fit into a marketing funnel approach to helping readers with career change.
  5. Approach people who are in various stages of career change and request a (recorded) interview. The idea is for some of these to appear in the book, and on the website (as bonus audios, case histories etc).

OK. That’s enough to be getting on with a for a while.
Your comments and suggestions are very welcome.

Wherever possible, I’ll post updates on the progress of Mark’s ‘effortless authorship’ project.

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